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More to Not Love about 'More to Love'

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One mom is on the fence about this controversial new show.

More to Love

Diane Mizota: I am all for diversity on television. That's why I'm such a fan of reality TV, because more people are represented than just the glossy, skinny, predominantly Caucasian, model types that play cops, detectives, and moms on so many scripted shows. Let's face it, most women on television just look like they need to eat a donut. It's a powerfully misogynistic climate, it's not reflective of what true Americans look like, but such is the state of television and media today.

Along comes a show, "More to Love," claiming to cast real people in the tried-and-true "Bachelor" reality dating show format. Sounds like it should be a step forward, right? A step towards equality and acceptance that women come in all shapes and sizes, and we should all be loved for who we are on the inside, right?

Not so fast. This show may have lofty intentions (which I kind of doubt) to shed light on the difficulties of overweight people's quest for love, but it comes off as more of a fat fetish show. The women's heights and weights are posted on-screen alongside their names. It is distracting and completely objectifying. It treats them like they are alien female fat specimens that need to be identified by their measurements.

One thing's for sure, they have their share of issues. So many tears in the first episode! Melissa, who's never dated, was adorable when Luke gave her his jacket and she didn't know if she should put her arms through the sleeves or not. Totally endearing. And also a reality-show time bomb.

Is it a game changer? No. Is it entertaining? Mildly. Look, it's not curing cancer, it doesn't have to wear the mantle of postmodern feminism, it's a reality dating show. If you're looking for your fix before the next "Bachelor" season begins, with big characters and emotional women creating drama over one guy, then "More to Love" is sure to deliver. As a self-proclaimed dirty reality television whore, I'll be watching ... will you?


next: Fly the Unfriendly Skies
6 comments so far | Post a comment now
dean July 29, 2009, 12:41 PM

I thought it looked like a fat fetish show as well.

Kristi July 29, 2009, 7:39 PM

I think the issues are way more than these women’s weight! With over half of the population overweight or obese, I find it hard to believe that they cannot find a date because of their size, probably more due to their own neuroses. Such a shame really because many of them were very beautiful!

christine July 30, 2009, 10:36 AM

it seems to me that instead of these women being proud of what size they are and showing that there are men out there that like women of different sizes - we made these women pathetic and I think watching this show only contributes to the network making money off of objectifying women based on their weight.

menotyou August 5, 2009, 3:13 PM

I really believe that you need to have a completely sociopathic personality to be a reality show producer. I mean, obviously they took the womens’ heights and weights off the show last night in response to all the criticism. But why do it in the first place? Only to humiliate them, that’s why. I’d like to hear what Mike Fleiss has to say about that, or better yet, an apology would be appropriate.

menotyou August 5, 2009, 3:13 PM

I really believe that you need to have a completely sociopathic personality to be a reality show producer. I mean, obviously they took the womens’ heights and weights off the show last night in response to all the criticism. But why do it in the first place? Only to humiliate them, that’s why. I’d like to hear what Mike Fleiss has to say about that, or better yet, an apology would be appropriate.

Susan Lajoy March 29, 2011, 3:34 PM

You are a very clever individual!


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