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Kid Kicked out of Class for NFL Haircut

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This 8th grader was put on the defensive for his football team hairstyle.

Cincinnati Bengals fan

Dustin Reader is nuts about football -- the Cincinnati Bengals, in particular. In order to show his devotion to his favorite team, the Ohio teen had the Bengals' team insignia -- the letter "B" -- shaved into his hair. His school, however, gave him an "F."

Now the 14-year-old has been suspended from school because officials at Garfield Middle School say that his extreme hairstyle is "too distracting." Hmm, guess all the news coverage the school is getting for their decision won't be too distracting, right?

School officials say he will be allowed back into school when his hair grows back, or when he changes his hairstyle.

What do you think? Is the school's decision out-of-bounds? Or is the principal a die-hard Pittsburgh Steelers fan?



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4 comments so far | Post a comment now
Ady November 12, 2009, 11:08 AM

I think it’s ridiculous a kid was suspended for this. When I was in high school in the early 90’s boys did this and no one got in trouble for it. Give him a break he’s just supporting a football team.

Andrew November 12, 2009, 11:31 AM

This is so stupid…the school. My high school had a policy where nobody can wear jerseys or any professional sports attire. That was not because it was distracting, but it might cause brawls and rifts between different groups supporting different teams. However, they allowed haircuts like this, all sorts, because it’s not offensive.

Joe November 17, 2009, 6:27 AM

You’d think they’d have bigger fish to fry in a middle school. Distracting. I wonder how distracting it is being in a national media spotlight for a while.

mitral valve January 20, 2011, 4:23 AM

Thanks for the tips, maybe I can use this through my multiethnic marketing and I’ve been use whatever ethnic media in getting a traffic and they love truly a big help on me.
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