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Sex Offender List

Megan's Law was put into effect in 1996, which required states to make information about convicted sex offenders a matter of public record. States define the types of sex offenders who will be required to register and report to law enforcement on a regular basis.

4 Red Flags One May Be a Sex Offender


  1. Someone who repeatedly tries to arrange one-on-one, alone time with a child.
  2. Someone who lavishes an extraordinary amount of attention or praise on a particular child.
  3. Someone who often gives special gifts or treats to one child for no apparent reason.
  4. Someone who prefers to spend most of their free time with children and seems to have no interest in age-appropriate relationships or friendships with other adults or colleagues.

The California Office of the Attorney General's website provides access to over 63,000 people in the state who are required to register in CA as sex offenders. The last registered home addresses of over 35,000 offenders are posted. More than 30,000 other offenders are included in the listing with a ZIP code, city, and county. Law enforcement personnel have information on over 20,000 other offenders not posted on the website. Other states have sex offender lists available online as well.

 

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What Moms Can Do to Protect Their Kids from Predators on the Sex Offender List

Moms in California may enter their ZIP codes on the Attorney General's website to find out if sex offenders live in their neighborhoods. In some cases, exact addresses are posted. Parents will then know to keep their children away from listed residences or areas. Other states provide similar website features.

Without the sex offender list, it can be difficult to identify predators.

Safety expert Pattie Fitzgerald of Safely Ever After, Inc., says, "Sex offenders are experts at grooming parents and kids into thinking they're the pillar of the community. In fact, it's what they count on us believing. It's how they get away with doing what they do, often for years at a time. So, how can we protect our kids? By paying attention to the clues and cues of those adults who interact with them on a regular basis. Talk to your kids daily, ask questions, and most importantly, listen to what they have to say."

Fitzgerald suggests telling kids the following information to help protect them from sex offenders:

  • No one has the right to touch you in any way that makes you feel uncomfortable.
  • Sometimes people may seem nice at first, and later ask you to do something you don't want to do.
  • It's okay to say NO, especially to an adult who gives you an "uh-oh" feeling.
  • It's not your fault if someone tries to touch you inappropriately.
  • Tell a parent or another trusted adult if you feel bad.
  • If you can't tell your parent, find someone else to help you -- maybe the parent of a close friend. Keep telling until you get help.

Not all sex offenders are caught and convicted, according to the CA Attorney General. Sex offenses are often committed by family members or someone else the victim knows.

Moms may enter their ZIP codes on the Family Watchdog website to find out if sex offenders live in their neighborhoods. In some cases, exact addresses are posted. Parents will then know to keep their children away from listed residences or areas. Other states provide similar website features.


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Related Momlogic Stories on the Sex Offender List

  1. Sexting Lands Teen on Sex Offender List
  2. Don't Evict This Sex Offender!
  3. From the Mouth of a Predator

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Additional Resources for the Sex Offender List